Customer Review Panel

About Seattle Public Utilities

Seattle Public Utilities (SPU) provides essential drinking water, drainage and wastewater, and solid waste services to more than 1.5 million people in the greater Seattle area, all while protecting our environment. About 1,400 SPU employees work with our community to provide affordable and equitable stewardship of our water and waste resources for future generations.

A Customer Review Panel was established to provide input on the Strategic Business Plan and periodically review Seattle Public Utilities' progress in implementing the plan. Panel members are selected by the Mayor and City Council.

Current Panel Members

Suzanne M. Burke

Suzie Burke is an active participant in the Fremont business community and also serves on the board of the North Seattle Industrial Association and Fremont Chamber of Commerce. She is a former member of the SPU’s Creeks, Drainage and Wastewater Advisory Committee. She is particularly interested in representing the needs and interests of small businesses in keeping rates and ecological cleanups reasonable. Suzie works in the Fremont neighborhood, and resides in Ballard.

Bobby Coleman

Bobby Coleman leads environmental stewardship and sustainability initiatives at Seattle Housing Authority. His professional experience has focused primarily on energy and water efficiency projects and program development and management, capital planning, continuous improvement, and data analysis. He is passionate about human and environmental health and well-being, historic preservation, and food politics. Bobby lives in Queen Anne.

Ebony Rose Frazier

Ebony Rose Frazier works at King County Community Corrections Division Administration section as a project manager. She has a master's degree in Public Administration from the Evans School of Public Policy and Governance at the University of Washington. She is on the Executive Board of Africatown, and a lead volunteer with Gifts of Hope. Ebony sees the importance of connecting community to local government and will bring her lived experience and anti-racism lens to work with SPU on ways to model inclusive, equitable practices.

Gretchen Glaub

Gretchen Glaub is the Salmon Recovery Coordinator for Snohomish County. Gretchen is interested in Puget Sound ecosystem recovery, specifically addressing water quality issues - contaminants of emerging concern (e.g., PAHs, PBDEs). She describes herself as: a “renter who has worked with landlord to implement updates for resource conservation (water, heating); professional interested in supporting activities to recover our endangered species and restore salmon runs on the brink of listing; volunteer invested in sharing knowledge and passion for Puget Sound environs with others; individual with deep love for our shared environment.”

Raj Kumar

Raj Kumar spent more than 35 years directing process improvements and managing energy, water, and waste reduction for 20 manufacturing plants and corporate headquarters of Nestle Purina, bringing them to zero waste to landfills. He currently spends his time volunteering with AARP on tax preparation for low-income seniors in Seattle, working with youth at Northwest Education Access, and growing food in his P-Patch for Mary’s Place and Ballard Food Bank. Raj is passionate about waste reduction, energy and water conservation to make our world better for future generations. He moved to Seattle about five years ago to get closer to his grandchildren. He has observed that City of Seattle recycles and composts its waste, and Raj would like to take this even to higher levels by smart recycling and “educating” its residents.

Noel Miller

Noel Miller, P.E. is a retired municipal public works and utilities director and a licensed civil engineer with a Master’s in Public Administration. His 40 year career has been focused on municipal stormwater, wastewater, water supply and transportation programs, systems and projects in the Puget Sound region. His early career involved practicing as a project engineer for several local consulting civil engineering firms. In 2012, he was appointed to the SPU’s Creeks, Drainage and Wastewater Advisory Committee and served as a co-chair. In 2013 and 2014, he served as the Chair of the Customer Review Panel, supporting the creation of SPU’s 2015-2020 strategic business plan. A Seattle resident since the late 1970‘s, Noel now resides in the Phinney Ridge neighborhood after living in the West Seattle, Matthews Beach and Madison Park neighborhoods. He is an advocate for increasing the public’s understanding and appreciation of regional and local water quality issues and infrastructure in general. He is also interested in finding effective solutions to the ongoing challenge of financing SPU’s programs and projects.

Maria McDaniel

Maria McDaniel is a Seattle native and lives in the Rainier Beach community. She has more than 25 years of business development, marketing, management, and IT experience working with corporate sector and non-profit organizations. She has a Bachelor of Science in Business Administration from Central Washington University and her background includes strategic planning, community relations, fundraising, consulting, and corporate stewardship. Maria was appointed to SPU's Creeks, Drainage and Wastewater Advisory Committee in 2018 and served until the end of 2020. She currently works for the City of Seattle as a Senior Business Analyst in the Information Technology Department and is active in the community supporting a variety of organizations including the Rainier Food Bank, Southeast Seattle Senior Center, Duwamish Tribe, and currently serves as a board member for Onyx Fine Arts Collective and volunteers her time as a 501 Commons Executive Service Corps member. Maria's interest in wastewater stems from her concern for the environment and she wants to increase public awareness.

Amanda Richer

Amanda Richer leverages her lived experience being unhoused to advocate for data driven and evidence-based solutions to end homelessness locally, regionally, and nationally. As a Community Liaison for DON, Amanda brings valuable feedback from the unhoused community and service providers to inform projects throughout the City. She serves on several boards and committees and is the Vice Chair of the Seattle/King County Healthcare Network for the Homeless Governance Council. Amanda is a passionate advocate for those without clean and regular access to water and the environmental, health, social, and mental impact this has.

Robin Schwartz

Robin Schwartz is a South Park resident, heavily involved in the Duwamish Community through Duwamish River Community Coalition, Concord Elementary PTA, Duwamish Valley Affordable Housing Coalition, and South Park Neighborhood Association. Robin is very interested in climate resilience in the Duwamish Valley and equitable outreach, particularly for those most impacted like renters and low-income people.

Tiffany Sevilla

Tiffany Sevilla is a Stormwater Management engineer with the Port of Seattle. Tiffany is interested in helping identify emergent strategies for building community wealth. I n her words: “I'm an advocate for culturally relevant support and empowerment of communities of opportunity. I am passionate about working toward environmental justice to support public health. I have experience organizing communities, developing programming and procedures, and building relationships with diverse stakeholders. I'm extremely proud of my neighborhood in south Beacon Hill and committed to supporting local youth and BIPOC efforts to build a livable, just home for us all.”

Miki Sodos

Miki Sodos is a small business owner in Seattle. She co-owns Café Pettirosso in Capitol Hill, Bang Bang Kitchen in Rainier Valley and Bang Bang Café in Belltown, and is an industry professional with 30 years in hospitality. Originally from New Mexico, she moved to Seattle in 2002 after graduating from the University of New Mexico with a Political Science degree. She has been a vocal advocate for small business issues and an active participant in the Shout Your Abortion movement. Miki is interested in providing equal quality of services to all our neighborhoods and increasing education about clean water issues, particularly in marginalized communities.